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Are you a Kaepernick or a Tebow? While We’re Waiting

Oh boy, partisan politics have been getting a tad bit contentious. President Donald Trump continues to make headlines as he repeatedly throws his own administration under the bus after they have done their best to spin the latest episode of As the Donald Turns. The liberal folk haven’t helped themselves either as they have screamed after even the most innocuous moves, which has left many skeptical of anything said from that side of the spectrum. So, how about we retreat into the safe space that is professional sports today.

Not that sports are an actual safe space from politics. Just start a discussion asking those in attendance their feelings about either Colin Kaepernick or Tim Tebow. You can quickly decipher party leanings in a matter of moments or make a dinner date with the parents of your significant others quite uncomfortable.

It is humorous since these two are so similar as players and as men.

The quarterback

Kaepernick is a mobile quarterback whose pistol offense took the NFL by storm as he led the San Francisco 49ers to a Superbowl after Alex Smith was injured. NFL defenses caught up to his offense and he has struggled to continue to be considered a starting option since. In 2016, he lost the starting job to Blaine Gabbert before Gabbert did Gabbert things. Head coach Chip Kelly still waited until mid-October to make the switch to Kaepernick. He would throw 16 touchdowns to just four interceptions, but he did so by managing the game for a team that went 1-10 with him at the helm. He only threw for only 6.8 YPA and 186 yards per game.

Tim Tebow was an unstoppable force in college on his way to winning National Championships and the Heisman trophy. His ability to run over defenders and make accurate downfield passes was the perfect combination for those Florida Gator teams. He briefly was the starting quarterback of the Denver Broncos after Kyle Orton was injured as he developed an uncanny ability to make the perfect throw late in the game to help them break into the playoffs. There he defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers on just such a throw to Demaryius Thomas. A wonky throwing motion would mitigate trust in his ability to quarterback as he was cut after just two seasons with Denver. The New York Jets, New England Patriots, and Philadelphia Eagles each tried him out as a fullback / tight end / quarterback combination player. He did not stick with any team though he would play two games for the Jets.

The man

Kaepernick is a liberal social warrior who is an activist willing to donate and speak out for causes he deems worthy. Even those who disagree with his causes should be able to discern he is a noble and spiritual man who is doing what he believes is the correct thing to do. He has given well over a million dollars to ship food to Somalia, help fund Meals on Wheels, sponsor the protests at Standing Rock, and, of course, continue his efforts with Black Lives Matter. As part of BLM, he has used his status to create a platform to seek out trust building discussions, town halls, and out reach programs between the police and communities they serve.

Tebow is a conservative philanthropist who has also made donations of money, time, and speech a daily part of his devotion. He started the Tim Tebow Foundation whose chief goal is to bring hope to those in need across the world- particularly children. Tebow even pays the salaries of everyone on staff in order to ensure that all donations go directly to outreach programs such as the mission trips he sponsors. He views his celebrity and athletic ability as a platform for his charitable works, which is the focus of his life. Even those who disagree with his religious message should be able to discern he is a noble and spiritual man who is doing what he believes is the correct thing to do.

The current controversy

Kaepernick is looking for a job. The pseudo-controversy revolves around whether or not he is being black-balled by the NFL. There are mixed reports, but it seems he asked the 49ers to remain as the starting quarterback for around $10 million per year if he were to re-write his deal. Instead, he was released, and he has not stated what his desires are. There are reports that only the Seattle Seahawks have even inquired about him as a backup option.

Quarterbacks such as Josh McCown and Blaine Gabbert have signed cheap deals elsewhere. Tony Romo and Jay Cutler have retired after being unable to find what they considered suitable employment. Ryan Fitzpatrick continues to look. Yet, it is Kaepernick who has had numerous articles penned on his behalf demanding an explanation for why he has yet to find gainful employment- and as a starter.

Many believe his kneeling during the National Anthem during games in 2016 that gave him status as a chief figurehead in the BLM movement is the reason he has yet to find a NFL job. Others note that his three-year sample looks awfully similar to Ryan Fitzpatrick in completion percentage (60%-60%), YPA (6.9-7.1), touchdown to interception ratio (41:19-60:40), yards per game (195-217), and quarterback rating (86-84).1

Tebow has a job. The pseudo-controversy revolves around his current employment being as a minor league baseball player after the New York Mets signed him to a $100,000 contract. There are many within the baseball community that feel it is unfair a 29 year old who spent over a decade away from the sport should displace even one minor league player from a roster. The furor is over Tebow being more marketing gimmick than actual prospect, which even the Mets have hinted to be true. The backlash has been loud against signing a player for such a purpose.

The playing level of Tebow has been a surprise to many. It took a current 0-for-10 slump to allow Dash Winningham to pass him as the second-best hitter on the team (Michael Paez being the best) as he has a slash line of .227/.309/.645. The numbers are not eye-popping, but they are adequate. In left field, he has two errors and an outfield assist. Moreover, as a marketing tool, he has been useful as the gates are up 30% at home and even more on the road (eight of the first 11 road games were sold out). His teammates have embraced his positive outlook, while also treating him as the rookie he is.

Last Word

Tim Tebow has long been a champion of many conservatives, and Colin Kaepernick is a newfound champion of many liberals. Maybe there is hope for all of us though because these men aren’t all that different. Sometimes it is nice to remember- no matter how strong we debate each other- neither are we.

  1. Cody Kessler eight GS, 66%, 153yd/gm, 6TD, 2INT, 7.1YPA, 92.3QBrating []

  • BenRM

    Super Natural always providing the quality gifs

  • CBiscuit

    This is like that show on the History Channel that I got sucked into, except there seems to be more credibility with your theories here. Let’s dub this, project “Hunting Crosskreutz”

    To cover our bases, we should remove that chain link fence in the yard and begin excavation.

  • woofersus

    I don’t want to come across as saying I don’t believe that you agree with his cause, because I do – but I think it’s impossible to separate the reaction to what he did from the nature of his cause. I was a bit torn about the specifics of the protest as well at first, butt was precisely the backlash he faced that was eye-opening to me in terms of how that cause is perceived in this country. If the goal was to raise some awareness, consider me one small success for him.

    I loathe the idea of getting into an internet debate about issues of race, so I’m trying to keep this fairly high level, but I have trouble with the notion that protest and fighting for a cause is only acceptable in ways that don’t actually cause any controversy or discussion. Obviously there are lines of morality one shouldn’t cross, but it feels a little disingenuous to hold symbolic patriotic acts like standing for the national anthem or putting your hand over your heart for the pledge of allegiance as sacred and untouchable when the core of the plight of minorities in America has been that their experience as Americans hasn’t necessarily been equal to the rest of us. To vilify somebody for choosing that as a way to call out injustice purely on the basis that by being in the situation to do so they are somehow disqualified from the sentiment feels hypocritical.

  • woofersus

    For sure if he was a top flight quarterback it would barely matter what he did, but can we really believe teams see him as worse than Blaine Gabbert?

  • Yeah, I know we identified the trinity of Simpsons, Futurama, and Scrubs the other day here. But Supernatural never fails, either. The D’Artagnan of the group.

  • Garry_Owen

    Seems to me that if it’s okay for one person to unfairly vilify a whole nation, it’s perfectly okay for a vast portion of that nation to vilify that person in return. Quid pro quo. (FWIW, I think both the nature of the protest and the nature of the backlash are equally foolish, but sometimes poking a hornet’s nest gets you stung. As the kids say, “it is what it is.” There’s plenty of hypocrisy to go around.)

  • Garry_Owen

    The problem with conspiracy theories is that the deeper you go, the scarier it becomes. At this point, I’m actually afraid of what we will find when we start digging. (Notice I said “when.” Oh, yes. The shovels have been purchased.)

  • mgbode

    You mean the guy who beat him out in Training Camp last year?

    (I think Kaep is better than Gabbert, but Gabbert signed for $1m/yr. Whether or not Kaep would have been willing to do so is the bigger question there.)

  • mgbode

    Shovels are inefficient. My method not only is less manual labor for us but also more likely to dig in the correct spot first.

    https://68.media.tumblr.com/e8dcfab8f4bbf01fa8c9150d8c259156/tumblr_ntpjx0UBHc1rjlj53o1_500.gif

  • Garry_Owen

    Okay. This is one of those perfectly timed gifs that you can watch all day. I’m so desperate to know what pup is going to find!!

  • NankirPhelge

    It’s not impossible for me to separate the reaction to the protest from the nature of the cause. It’s quite easy.

    But let us all agree to disagree. We all have different levels of tolerance and different standards of what is and isn’t acceptable, and that’s fine.

  • CBiscuit

    At first, I didn’t think there was anything there, until next to the stack of Playboys circa 1973-1975, we found a medal from the Battle of Stalingrad and a grainy photo of some soldiers standing next to a port o potty in happier times.

  • woofersus

    Fair enough. If your position is as you say it is, I take no offense to it, even if mine is slightly different. (and obviously I have no reason not to believe you)

  • woofersus

    Yes, I agree there are contractual variables we can’t know. Though I thought Gabbert thoroughly demonstrated for us last year that his ceiling is pretty low. It’s the potential upside of a Kaepernick reclamation that holds the interest, I think.

  • nj0

    “Ah, yes….. it is none other than the infamous Wolf of the Grand Cross. This fabricated interest in American sports is fooling no one.”

    To add something of actual value: I highly recommend the BBC documentary “War of the Century”. It covers the Eastern front of the European theater in World War II and has many interviews with kindly-looking old men who happily recount the atrocities they participated in during their misguided younger days.

  • nj0

    I say we cobble together some screenshots of stuff we find on Google, narrate it with some bad audio, drop in some inappropriate background music, and then put it up on Youtube. That’s called “making a documentary”.

  • JM85

    Not gonna lie, that is ridiculous.

  • mgbode

    And that depends on if your scouts think there is something he can reclaim or if he is who he is now. Just so many questions.

    Signing with Seattle could be beneficial though – if he gets his chance (Wilson injury), then we’d get to see what is really there.

  • Garry_Owen

    “Misguided” is an interesting choice of words. Those men were literally “misguided.” Misled. Brainwashed also works. Few of them had a choice, and even if they did have a choice, it wasn’t much of a choice. War can make monsters of the most decent people – which is why those compelling others into war face the harshest judgment.

  • RGB

    Dun dun dunnn…

    http://www.claremontshows.com/catalog/publications/pfw/1980/80-7.jpg

    It seems it is Grosskreutz, or Großkreutz in proper German.

  • nj0

    I agree with that.

    What is disturbing in some of the interviews is the seeming lack of regret. A few of these chuckle when remembering some pretty heinous things they did. But the moral angle aside, it is a fascinating watch. I can’t think of many instance where a Nazi, Soviet, et al has a chance to tell their story. And Eastern Europe in WW2 is, imo, criminally overlooked in America, especially when it comes to documentaries.

  • NankirPhelge

    Well okay, but just to be clear, my position is that I agree that there are been some very serious injustices done to blacks by police, and I’m very glad to see that this appears to be reversed, or at least the process is beginning.

    My other position is that I don’t like kneeling for the National Anthem. That’s all. Nothing beyond that. I don’t villify him for it, and I’m not going have a fit if someone signs him. I’m not even going to care.

  • Garry_Owen

    Aha! So it is “Grosskreutz.”

    Who is/was this nefarious guy? And why was he so interested in American football?

  • RGB
  • Eric G

    “Kaep willing to do so” is the operative narrative here. He is UNWILLING to be a backup QB. Sorry, Chuckles, you’re not that QB anymore. DA was good until he got figured out, accept that the same has occurred.

  • Garry_Owen

    So it was Gerhard that was the German POW!

    (Okay. As this is delving into the realm of real life, the conspiracy is getting to be less funny. Why did you have to demonstrate that this is a real person? Why couldn’t he just remain some nebulous name on an old mailing label? Stupid reality.)

  • JNeids

    Their pop culture references are always quality as well.

  • RGB

    I’m an engineer.
    It’s in my nature.

  • Garry_Owen

    Agree. The Soviets did more to beat the Nazis than we did. (The fact that the majority of Wehrmacht soldiers facing the allies in Normandy were not, in fact, German, says a lot about where Hitler’s priorities were.) Sadly, the closed society of Russia and Eastern Europe after the war eliminated so many opportunities for us to hear from the veterans on that side. I hope much more of it comes to light.

  • Garry_Owen

    To spoil people’s fun?

  • chrisdottcomm

    “(1) make way more than $1,100 a month : Tebow makes $17K/mo. as they are the terms of his contract with the Mets. He has been buying things for his teammates.”

    MY ROOMMATE MAKES $4,000 A MONTH POSTING ONLINE ADVERTISMENTS FORM THE COMFORT OF THEIR OWN HOME ON GOOGLE. CLICK BELOW TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN TOO!

    http://www.iamarussianbot.com

  • RGB

    Trust me, I don’t want to turn this into The Boys From Brazil, either…

  • mgbode

    to be fair, we don’t know if that is true

  • CBiscuit

    Look, I think we have enough money in Patreon to support our defense fund in the pending Estate of Ralf Grosskreutz v. WFNY Community and RGB Industries libel lawsuit. Plus, we have a couple of lawyers on staff to do pro bono work, right? Either way, we’re going to get to the bottom of this mystery!

  • nj0

    G_O never heard the one about the engineer in the French Revolution.

  • Garry_Owen

    Oh, do tell!

  • RGB

    RGB LLC.

  • Garry_Owen

    In this case, it will be pro bono pro se.

  • mgbode

    I’s has spence all da monies

  • CBiscuit

    Well no pro per for me. In fear of such things, years ago I formed a separate group to shield liability: WFNY n’ Friends LLC. It’s just me and Shamrock, really. I will not be named in the suit, but will represent you guys to the somewhat best of my limited abilities.

  • Garry_Owen

    “Somewhat best” is good enough for me. You’re hired!

  • RGB

    I have total faith in Slippin Garry.

  • nj0

    Hundreds are lined up for the guillotine. The first up is a priest. He asks to die facing his lord, so the executioner allows him to lay on his back. Executioner pulls the lever. The blade comes down and miraculously stops inches away from the neck of the priest. A miracle, no doubt. Not one to question the divine, the executioner lets the priest go free.

    Up next, a drunk. He saw what just happened so he too asks to lay on his back. Executioner allows it. Lever is pulled. Another miracle – the blade is stopped before it can kill him.

    Third in line is an engineer. He asks for the same and lays on his back in the guillotine. All is silent as the condemned look on, hoping for yet another miracle. The executioner grasps the lever and just as he’s about to pull it, the engineer says, “Ohhh…. I see what the problem is…”

  • BenRM

    Everyone has an equal opportunity to act like an a-hole. ‘Merica!

  • Garry_Owen
  • CBiscuit

    Typical. Everywhere I turn, I’m always being taxed to pay for somebody’s (j)WAR

  • Garry_Owen

    In other news, charges dropped against Caleb Brantley.

  • woofersus

    No worries, that’s exactly what I took your position to be.

    I also felt happy that in some of the high profile cases the subsequent DOJ investigations revealed some pretty corrupt practices and led to change. There was a bit less publicity to it, but nonetheless it’s reassuring that at least there can be oversight that holds localities accountable. I remain concerned that there are many more out there.

    I felt queasy about the national anthem thing as well at first, but later began to feel it was justified based on the incredible show of racial bias and sometimes outright hatred that suddenly emerged. And as I said, I’m not painting everybody who disagrees with his protest with a single, broad brush. I just know that it took something like that to really educate somebody like me.

  • Steve

    “I don’t know what else he could have done”

    I’m sorry, but this is the kind of response that eats at me. I get complaints of his forms of protest, but without some kind of semblence of an idea of the “correct” way, it doesn’t seem like a legit criticism to me.

    And this is besides the whole effing point of protest is to agitate, stand out, and draw attention. Protesting from one’s own backyard doesn’t do anything. If it doesn’t annoy people, its not working.