General

While We’re Waiting… Where Losing is a Disease

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While We’re Waiting serves as the early morning gathering of WFNY-esque information for your viewing pleasure. Have something you think we should see? Send it to our tips email at tips@waitingfornextyear.com.

“With soon-to-be-ex-Indians’ closer Chris Perez dominating the (Indians) news this week, I find it unusual that a couple of months ago he was laying into the fans for not buying into this pre-collapse team – that was in 1st place at the time – because people weren’t believing that the team’s success was real…while not supporting them at the turnstiles. Now that the collapse is complete, he has moved the periscope to set his targets on the people that constructed that same team that he wanted everyone to buy into just a few months ago. As the wind blows and as the targets move, so do the shots that come out of Perez’s barrel. That’s not to say that what Perez said (or has said) is fundamentally incorrect, but for as much as his comments have seemed like “someone look at me or listen to me…please” moments, because of the timing of his comments, they were largely ignored on the grand scale because of the start of the Browns’ season garnering so much (unfounded, according to Perez) attention on the North Coast and because of the death of Art Modell occupying people’s minds.” [Cousineau/The DiaTribe]

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Interesting. A breakdown of who played how many snaps. Josh Cribbs was in on one offensive play– “I guess we can’t be too surprised with the distribution here, although I expected Little to have the most snaps. I wasn’t sure during the game if Cribbs had gotten in, but he was on the field once. I suspected that I knew which play that was, and I went back and checked. Sure enough, it was the double/triple reverse play in which Benjamin went for 35 yards. Cribbs was the guy who did the final lateral to Benjamin.” [Pokorny/Dawgs by Nature]

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“Without question, the NFL began its regular season shrouded in an unprecedented kind of ambiguity. The moral basis for its very existence is in question in a way that never has been the case before — and, generally, the moral basis for football itself is being questioned in a way that hasn’t occurred since Teddy Roosevelt threatened to ban the game in 1905. Usually, football has been able to toughen up and brazen its way past complaints about its inherent violence. But there are too many aging, walking wounded these days for those testosterone-fueled alibis to hold anymore. Former players — many of whom are tougher now on their plastic knees and with the amyloid encroaching on their brains than the radio cowboys yapping about the “wussification” of the game they love — are witnesses beyond reproach. This is going to require that Roger Goodell be smart and humble. The latter, especially, never has been a conspicuous characteristic of the job he holds. But, hey, the Redskins went down to New Orleans and hung 40 on the Saints and won the game, and Robert Griffin III played like a genuine star. So the commissioner’s probably overjoyed, and my tow truck driver is probably pretty happy, too.” [Pierce/Grantland]

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“Weeden’s quarterback rating, while almost comically low, was not the lowest in franchise history. Bruce Gradkowski posted a 1.0 in 2008, and Jeff Garcia (2004) and the immortal Don Gault (1970) put up 0.0 – the lowest possible rating. And according to ESPN Stats & Information, Weeden is just the third quarterback since the start of the 2008 season to attempt at least nine passes of more than 10 yards downfield and not complete a pass (he was 0-for-9). The other two were J.P. Losman in 2008 and Brodie Croyle in 2010. Not the kind of company we like to see Weeden keeping.” [Red Right 88]

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Can’t we just enjoy a thing without making it something stupid? [Shutdown Corner]

  • humboldt

    I hate when people unthinkingly refer to football as “violent”. It is most certainly a highly aggressive game, but outright violence is penalized (i.e. unnecessary roughness, personal fouls, illegal use of hands to the face, spearing, chop blocks, etc) and sanctioned against (i.e. suspensions, ejections).

    I’m hoping we can gradually devise improved rules, technology, and treatment methods to protect players while preserving the essence of the game as we know it today. But if you start from the premise that the game itself is “violent” it precludes this very possibility.